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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 22nd September 2008 , 08:45 PM
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Now I'm getting really excited about this thread. It was me alone here all and it was pretty damn lonely. Thank's guys, I was starting to think the thread might die a slow death but you guys are giving it a new lease of life.

Anyone else out there feel like adding a music they are passionate about?
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Old 22nd September 2008 , 09:37 PM
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Introduction to fado

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jt0WUyrG8b8

"Fado" comes from the latim word fatum which means destiny.
Fado is a tradicional portuguese music genre that is known by the use of portuguese guitars (that have 12 strings) and sad poems (almost like blues).
Legend says fado was born in between 18th and 19th centuries because of the cultural mixture in Lisbon at that date.
It got its rich melody and complex rythms on the first half of the 20th century
become more artistic, because the simple verses were replaced by more elaborate poems.
It became more commercialized during 1930 and 1940 because of radio, cinema and theatre. The fadista was then born as an artist. With this "Houses of Fado" started to emerge bringing the "fadista" as a professional musician. The fadista is know to sing with black clothings which simbolizes the obscure and the quitness of the night. Fado is meant to be heard with a "soul that can listen" ("alma que sabe escutar").
There are 2 types of fado:
Fado of Lisbon and Fado of Coimbra (yay my hometown )
I will only post videos of these 2 fados as their story is way to much to put here and also have a lot of smilarities (although i am sorry )

Fado of Lisbon

YouTube - Quando Lisboa Canta

Fado of Coimbra

YouTube - Fado Coimbra Serenata Monumental Queima
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Old 22nd September 2008 , 11:13 PM
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Sorry i couldn't add anything to this but i simply have no experience nor knowledge on this, but keep up the good work its really coming along nicely
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Old 23rd September 2008 , 06:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by e-vinyl View Post
Introduction to fado

YouTube - Amália Rodrigues - "tudo isto é fado"

"Fado" comes from the latim word fatum which means destiny.
Fado is a tradicional portuguese music genre that is known by the use of portuguese guitars (that have 12 strings) and sad poems (almost like blues).
Legend says fado was born in between 18th and 19th centuries because of the cultural mixture in Lisbon at that date.
It got its rich melody and complex rythms on the first half of the 20th century
become more artistic, because the simple verses were replaced by more elaborate poems.
It became more commercialized during 1930 and 1940 because of radio, cinema and theatre. The fadista was then born as an artist. With this "Houses of Fado" started to emerge bringing the "fadista" as a professional musician. The fadista is know to sing with black clothings which simbolizes the obscure and the quitness of the night. Fado is meant to be heard with a "soul that can listen" ("alma que sabe escutar").
There are 2 types of fado:
Fado of Lisbon and Fado of Coimbra (yay my hometown )
I will only post videos of these 2 fados as their story is way to much to put here and also have a lot of smilarities (although i am sorry )

Fado of Lisbon

YouTube - Quando Lisboa Canta

Fado of Coimbra

YouTube - Fado Coimbra Serenata Monumental Queima
Thanks for the post e-vinyl but I think you could fill it out more. I try to give an idea of the instruments and the sounds that characterise the music so that anyone who wants to add this music to their track have a better idea of what things to add.

What are the instruments used in Fado?
What are the musical elements? Scales? Keys? Chords? Melody types? etc

Looking forward to what else you can tell us.
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Old 23rd September 2008 , 06:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sureno View Post
Sorry i couldn't add anything to this but i simply have no experience nor knowledge on this, but keep up the good work its really coming along nicely
Yes, Paul it is taking shape.

It's not everyone's area. I have the benefit of having studied and also lectured on this stuff and this is one of my ways of giving something to the forums that is possibly unique and not seen elsewhere.

Maybe, you or some one else could do something similar with a thread on the genres of dance music. I was planning it but that is still not my domain. I have been working through the recommended listing threads I set up on house, D'n'B, techno etc.

There...I've thrown the dog a bone (speaking metaphorically...have to specify just in case!). Let's see where it goes!
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Old 23rd September 2008 , 07:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sphelan View Post
Yes, Paul it is taking shape.

It's not everyone's area. I have the benefit of having studied and also lectured on this stuff and this is one of my ways of giving something to the forums that is possibly unique and not seen elsewhere.

Maybe, you or some one else could do something similar with a thread on the genres of dance music. I was planning it but that is still not my domain. I have been working through the recommended listing threads I set up on house, D'n'B, techno etc.

There...I've thrown the dog a bone (speaking metaphorically...have to specify just in case!). Let's see where it goes!
nice idea shane and don't worry your not the first and wont be the last to call poor ol' me a dog
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Old 23rd September 2008 , 08:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sureno View Post
nice idea shane and don't worry your not the first and wont be the last to call poor ol' me a dog
Metaphorically!!!
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Old 23rd September 2008 , 11:18 AM
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Edit: David Bowie's China Girl to Introduction to Chinese Music
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Old 24th September 2008 , 09:20 AM
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Default Introduction to Irish Traditional Music

Introduction to Irish Traditional Music

Thin Lizzy



U2




Ireland has a rich musical heritage and there are many Irish groups which are well known on the world stage such as U2, Thin Lizzy, Van Morrizon, Enya, The Divine Comedy, Sined OConnor, The Pogues and The Corrs. But if all you know about Irish or Celtic music is Riverdance or that it sounds diddly-dieddly, its time to take a trip to the Emerald Isle and check out the wealth of traditional music there.

Riverdance



Some Background

Ireland is the only country which has a musical instrument as its national symbol the harp and this signifies the importance of music in Irish culture. Music is not the area of just professionals but many people either sing, play an instrument or dance from an early age. The music is lively and has traditionally been passed on orally from generation to generation with people playing in their homes or in pubs and eventually on the concert stage. It is music to listen to but most of all to dance to. Theres possibly nothing more relaxing than sipping on a Guinness in a pub while listening to some traditional music. Music is everywhere at home, in the pubs, on the street, in the schools and in the music competitions.

An Irish Traditional music session



Important Instruments

Irish Traditional music has two main divisions singing and instrumental playing. The instruments can be divided in to three types: strings, wind and percussion.

String instruments include the harp, the fiddle (violin), the banjo, the mandolin, and more recently the guitar and bouzouki.

Wind instruments include the uilleann pipes (a type of bagpipe), the flute, the tin whistle (or penny whistle), the accordion and the concertina.

The main percussion instrument is the bodhrn which is an open frame drum. In addition, performers can use anything to make a percussive sound such as bones or sticks.

The harp is possibly the oldest of the instruments used in Irish traditional music. It has been played since the 500s AD and was initially passed on as an oral tradition. The harper was the second most important person to the Chieftain in the clan system. With the collapse of the clan system, the professional musicians became itinerants. Many of the old harpers were blind and could only survive on what they earned from playing music. The strings were made of wire and the harp was played with the fingernails. The music was ornamented with grace notes etc. This old tradition disappeared and while there was an attempt to revive it with the Belfast Harp Festival of 1792 the tradition was dead before 1840. The new or neo-Irish harp which is what is mostly seen to day has gut strings.

The Chieftains featuring Derek Bell on harp



The fiddle is a normal violin but placed in an Irish way with shorter bow movements due to the speed of the music. Players normally play in the first position and very little vibrato is used.

Mairead Ni Mhaonaig



The banjo has four strings and is usually played with a plectrum. It has a distinctive metallic sound due to the membrane covering the resonator box.

Kieran Hanrahan



The mandolin has eight strings and is placed with a plectrum. It is tuned the same as a fiddle so players can switch from one instrument to the other without having to learn new fingering positions for the tune.


The uilleann pipes are a type of bagpipe but unlike the Scottish pipes they are not blown into. Rather movements of the elbow fill and empty the air bag. They are a very complicated instrument and are often referred to as the king of instruments. The player plays drone notes as well as chordal sounds and the melody.

Davy Spillane



There are two types of accordion used in Irish traditional music the button and the piano. The button is thought of as more traditional than the piano version. The accordion, like the uilleann pipes can play both melody and harmony.

Sharon Shannon



The concertina is originally of English origin and was probably brought to Ireland by English sailors. It has a distinctive sound and plays the melody with some occasional two-note chords. The buttons on the instrument are divided half for the right hand and the other half for the left.

Noel Hill



The tin whistle or pennywhistle is made of metal and has six finger holes. It has a high pitched sound and is played vertically. A tin whistle comes in a given key and players often carry a couple of whistles with them in the most common keys.

Paddy Maloney



The flute is made of wood or metal and is placed horizontally. The wooden flute is favoured due to its tone. There are six finger holes and it sounds lower than the tin whistle.

Matt Molloy



The bordhrn is a frame drum and has a long history. It is covered on one side only with goat skin which may be decorated with Celtic symbols (though, this is usually to attract souvenir hunters). It is played with a short stick or with the hand and the player can play on the skin or on the wooden frame. The tone of the drum can be altered by the placing of the non-beater hand.

John Hoe Kelly



Modern developments in Irish traditional music have seen the introduction of the piano, the harpsichord and the synthesizer. In addition, stringed instruments such as the guitar (often with an alternative tuning, e.g. dadgad), the bass, and the bouzouki from Greece. More exotic addition have been the didgeridoo from Australia and various percussion instruments and drums from around the world.

Steve Cooney



Important Musical Features

Sean nos is the traditional singing style. The songs may be in free time or may have a time signature and the melody line is embellished with ornaments. The singer tries to introduce variations each time they sing a different verse such as changing the ornamentation, the rhythm or the melodic intervals.

This is also seen in the dance music where the melodies are short (8 bars) and are repeated with variations. In the dance music the tunes generally have the structure AABB where each section is of eight bars long. Thus the first part of the tune is repeated and the second part of the tune is repeated. After this the whole tune is repeated again or may twice more. This adds length to the tunes. In addition, several tunes are linked together to provide a set of tunes which arrives at the required length of a particular dance.



There are various tune types each with its own time signature and these include. See Folk music of Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia for some audio examples.

The reel is the fastest and possibly the most popular tune type in Irish traditional music. It is written in 4/4 time with patterns of running quavers. See Reel (dance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) for an audio example.


The jig may be a double jig in 6/8 time, a slip jig in 9/8 time or a single jig or slide in 12/8 time. It is not played as fast as the reel and has a bounce or lilt to it. See Jig - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia for an audio example.

The hornpipe, like the reel, is written in 4/4 time but is much slower that the reel and seems to bounce along.

The polka is popular in the region of Kerry and is written in 2/4 time. It is short and snappy.


The keys of the dance tunes are usually restricted to a handful of keys such as D, G, and A major. In addition, there are modal tunes such as in the A dorian (A B C D E F# G) and E (E F# G A B C# D) dorian, the A and D mixolydian or the A, B, and E minor aeolian. Follow this link if you need to brush up on your modes Musical mode - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The ornaments used in Irish traditional music vary but include the playing of triplets on a crotchet note. This can be a rhythmic triplet where the melody note is repeated three times (A = AAA) or it can be melodic where other notes are added to the principle note (A =CBA). Another way of decorating a long note like a crotchet is with a turn where notes above and below the principle note are played (A = BAGA). Single note ornaments are similar to appoggiaturas and are crushed in before the main note (A = CA). A fiddle player may decorate a note by sliding up to it from a lower note (A=G-A).

Important Performers


Groups
The Chieftains
De Dannan
Stocktons Wing

Fiddle
Paddy Glackin
Tommy Peoples

Flute
Matt Molloy

Tin Whistle
Paddy Moloney
Geraldine Cotter

Accordion
Sharron Shannon
Seamus Begley

Concertina
Noel Hill

Uilleann Pipes
Davy Spillane
Seamus Ennis
Willie Clancy

Banjo
Kieran Hanrahan

Bouzouki
Donel Lunny

Bodhran
Kevin Conneff
John Joe Kelly

Piano
Micheal O SuilleabhainS
Geraldine Cottor

Guitar
Arty McGlynn
Steve Cooney


Artists Who Have Incorporated Elements of Irish Traditional Music

The Corrs
Bryan Adams Im Ready (Unplugged) featuring Davy Spillane on low whistle.



Some Further Resources
Music of Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Folk music of Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Irish Music - traditional music from Ireland
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Jig.jpg (83.7 KB, 1 views)
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Old 24th September 2008 , 07:33 PM
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Hey shane is Polka a world music?

what about Russian music i love doing the dance at xmas


And to who ever is watching the 2nd vid, i know your joining in on the dance!!!My money says your feeling it by 0:29
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Old 25th September 2008 , 12:38 PM
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Polkas are a popular musical form in many cultures Paul. Think even of classical music and Strauss...New Year's Day concert from Vienna.


The Austrians have polkas...



and the Polish have polkas...



And like I said the Irish have polkas...
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