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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 24th September 2010 , 09:33 AM
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There are graphs about which show the frequency range of certain instruments but a grpah can never to tell you what to cut and boost. It depends what needs to happen to the track to help it sit with the other tracks in a mix. Take the relationship between bass and kick drum as an example. As they both sit in the same range you need to decide which you want to be prominent at which frequency. Sometimes you'll want the bass to be lower than the kick, sometimes higher. Same thing with vocals/guitar/piano. They are all basically in the same space. What you need to bring forward is the element of each instrument that you like so that they will interact best with the other. That's about trial and error on every single occasion. A couple of tips though:

1. Don't boost anything to make tracks sit together. Cut the other tracks. Boosts are best kept for sweetening.

2. Again, it all comes back to the arrangement. If the arrangement is good often you can automate volumes to provide a better effect than hacking out frequencies.
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Old 24th September 2010 , 09:35 AM
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Groove 3 Effects Plugins Explained was the one that worked for me.
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Old 24th September 2010 , 02:00 PM
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Trev is spot on, and at the risk of making him furious , here is one of those charts. But heed Trev's advice and only use these charts as way of knowing what ball park area to start searching for the frequency you want to attenuate.

Click this link to view a hi-res image of the cart: http://www.beantownboogiedown.com/st...ertz-Chart.png
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Old 24th September 2010 , 03:28 PM
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That's really helpful - thanks. Erm...don't want to confuse issues here, but since this is turning into a really helpful 'sticky' - are there similar kinds of graphs or guides as to the balance in gain between elements in a mix? I mean is there some sort of ratio between how loud the bass should be against the drums for example, and generally should the vocals and drums be the loudest elements in the mix? I know this is generally a judgement call, but just wondered if there was any common practices in regards to mixing.
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Old 16th November 2010 , 07:29 AM
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No. You really must use your ears to find the right balance. I usually start with the kick drum peaking at -20dbfs and build the mix from there.
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Old 14th June 2011 , 11:56 PM
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Hey, just thought I'd throw my 2 pence worth in. Something to remember and to aim for is to make your mix 3 dimensional, there's a lot of space availabe not only left to right in your mix, but also top to bottom (Frequency response) and also front to back (Delays, reverbs)

Remember low cut is your friend as subsonic frequencies can eat up headroom and also play havok with any compression used on group busses or the 2 buss.

Try and work on your eq with regard to frequencies that are summing, normal problem areas are somewhere round the 200-400 (mud) and 450-800 (room) these elements feature heavily in a LOT of sound sources, e.g. vocal, guitar, piano, bass, drums etc etc.

Also try and work on the dynamic range of your song (the difference in volume between the quietest elements and the loudest elements). Having good dynamic range (minimum 8dB roughly) will make your mix sound a lot more open.

Don't overcompress elements or groups as this can kill the life in your mix.

Hope it helps,

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