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Old 17th October 2008 , 09:15 PM
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Default Recording horns

Any tips? I really don't have a studio, but a living room and a rehesal room to use. Any recommentations for a budget mic, positioning mic etc.. And tips to use in commercial studio? I tend to have some recording sessions where i'm asked to, but to find a recording engineer with knowledge about horns rather than rock instruments....priceless
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Old 17th October 2008 , 09:58 PM
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If you had a great sounding room at your disposal I'd say a nice stereo pair of ribbons 4-6 ft out. experiment a bit with the configuration (spaced versus x-y). If you don't have a good room then spot mic with dynamics (Shure SM7/EV RE20/Sennheiser MD421).

Bear in mind that the sound takes a little time to develop on wind instruments. As a good rule of thumb, however long the instrument is from mouth to bell is about the same distance that will be the best spot to put your mic from the bell. When you bring a bad room into the equation you have to really balance the sound coming from the instrument against the colour the room imparts to get yourself to the best point you can.

Hope this helps!
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Old 18th October 2008 , 07:49 AM
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Most of the time I've been playing in studio it was just one large diaphgram condenser put 1 foot from the bell. Result has always been muddy and nasal sound. So the distance you suggest makes really sense. Any tips to playing section stuff to prevent leaking from a mic to another, still having enough distance to have a good sound? What is the thing we gain using stereo pair for single horn?
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Old 18th October 2008 , 08:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trbguy View Post
Most of the time I've been playing in studio it was just one large diaphgram condenser put 1 foot from the bell. Result has always been muddy and nasal sound.
Now you know why

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Originally Posted by trbguy View Post
So the distance you suggest makes really sense. Any tips to playing section stuff to prevent leaking from a mic to another, still having enough distance to have a good sound?
You could use the null side of ribbon mics to good effect if you want more separation. Arrange each player so they are in the null point of the other's ribbon mic

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What is the thing we gain using stereo pair for single horn?
Not so much for a single horn (unless you are particularly shooting for that), if you wanted to capture the horn section as a coherent unit this would be more useful.
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Old 18th October 2008 , 10:13 AM
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Quote:
Not so much for a single horn (unless you are particularly shooting for that), if you wanted to capture the horn section as a coherent unit this would be more useful.
So you mean recording it as it is, with just one stereo pair or pair for each horn?

How much do you think there is difference between ribbon and condencer? Anything else, but quality of mic itself? Different pattern? Anything else I might be missing?

Thanks
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Old 18th October 2008 , 10:30 AM
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Quote:
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So you mean recording it as it is, with just one stereo pair or pair for each horn?
Just one pair for the whole horn section

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How much do you think there is difference between ribbon and condencer? Anything else, but quality of mic itself? Different pattern? Anything else I might be missing?
Thanks
Both the tonality of the mic and the pattern of a ribbon works well for recording horn sections IMO. Don't just take my word for it though. Try it and compare. As ever, YMMV.
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Old 18th October 2008 , 10:34 AM
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Quote:
Just one pair for the whole horn section
So the balance of section must be good. There's not much you can do afterwards?
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Old 18th October 2008 , 11:03 AM
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So the balance of section must be good. There's not much you can do afterwards?
yup. spot on
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Old 22nd October 2008 , 02:28 PM
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hi trbguy
guessing you're a trombonist? me too! As trev has stated here, a great section of three or five or even more players should balance themselves out. Arrangement has a lot to do with the sound as well.
The real secret is great, accomplished players with just a couple of well placed mics in a room that is not too small. Again as Trev says, distance from the musicians is the key to allow all the sounds to gel together. On a budget, dynamic and ribbon mics are the order of the day, expensive LDCs are very good for solo instruments. Royer 121s are really sweet on brass - especially trumpets. Anything in fact.

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Old 22nd October 2008 , 03:31 PM
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Yes, I'm trombone player, really nice to have trombone player company here.

Best sound I ever had was made by vintage sony mic, if I remember correctly it was a C-38.

Unfortunately recording is only a hobby for me, so no fancy studio or expensive ribbon mics for me, except when doing freelance trombone gigs at commercial studios.
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Old 22nd October 2008 , 04:46 PM
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Take a look at Cascade Fatheads. Maybe you can even persuade DV to stock them!
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Old 22nd October 2008 , 04:55 PM
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Really good tip. In case anyone else is interested here's link Click me Ribbon mic for 160 dollars. Have you tested these yourself? DV really should stock these. Thanks
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Old 22nd October 2008 , 05:23 PM
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By the way how and why is Blumlein Bar used. Saw one on Cascades web site.
What's the idea here
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Old 3rd November 2008 , 10:00 PM
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Quote:
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By the way how and why is Blumlein Bar used. Saw one on Cascades web site.
What's the idea here
Read and ye shall see:

X-Y and Blumlein Stereo Recording
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Old 4th November 2008 , 09:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrevCircleStudios View Post
Read and ye shall see:

X-Y and Blumlein Stereo Recording
Thanks didn't find that before

Is there big difference between matched pair and just two mic's of same brand and model?
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