DV247 Forums - A Global Community for Music Makers Lowest Price Guaranteed, Free Delivery, Free 3 Year Warranty
Go Back   DV247 Forums - A Global Community for Music Makers > Digital Audio Sequencers > Other
Forgot Password? Join Us!
Home Register Groups FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Go to DV247.com
New to Forums or just joined? Why not start your journey here?

Other PC or Mac - Chat about your other favourite platforms here

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 25th September 2010 , 05:42 PM
Member
 
dariunas's Avatar
          
           
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Luton, Bedfordshire, UK
Posts: 91
Default OS Hard Drive type? Raptor or SSD?

So, I'm upgrading my system and drives and one thing I wanted to do was to have my OS run on something faster. At the moment, I'm using 2x 750Gb Samsung Spinpoint F1s.

I'm looking at a 64Gb SSD drive or a 115Gb VelociRaptor...

I don't know a great deal about the ins and outs of HD performance to be able to make an informed judgment/comparison, but if anyone could advise which would be better for a DAW, would be really great?
dariunas is offline Offline
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 27th September 2010 , 10:35 AM
Keeper o' the Keys!
 
Dave Boulden's Avatar
          
           
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kent, UK.
Posts: 2,470
Default

If this is specifically for your DAW, then you'll get the best bang-for-buck by using performance drives for audio recording and sample storage before looking at the the OS drive. Look at using either SSDs or a striped RAID array.
______________________________
The Dining Room Studio
http://www.drstudio.co.uk/
Dave Boulden is offline Offline
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 27th September 2010 , 12:07 PM
Mic Check 1!
 
TrevCircleStudios's Avatar
          
           
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: England
Posts: 3,829
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Boulden View Post
If this is specifically for your DAW, then you'll get the best bang-for-buck by using performance drives for audio recording and sample storage before looking at the the OS drive. Look at using either SSDs or a striped RAID array.
Really? I was reading only the other day that SSD's are so far unproven it terms of audio use.
______________________________
www.circlestudios.co.uk
TrevCircleStudios is offline Offline
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 27th September 2010 , 12:26 PM
Keeper o' the Keys!
 
Dave Boulden's Avatar
          
           
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kent, UK.
Posts: 2,470
Default

Yes Trev, I should qualify that further. It depends, the random access times of SSDs are better than HDs as there's no head to physically move, that makes it good for loading or streaming small files, that means things like multi-samples especially modern day sample libraries. But they can still be matched by regular HDs for streaming long audio files (i.e. your audio tracks). In my personal experience, RAID arrays are still the best overall option for performance audio.
______________________________
The Dining Room Studio
http://www.drstudio.co.uk/
Dave Boulden is offline Offline
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 27th September 2010 , 12:37 PM
Member
 
dariunas's Avatar
          
           
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Luton, Bedfordshire, UK
Posts: 91
Default

Always appreciate the input guys,

Since posting, I've gathered that,

The SSDs are witout without a doubt, quieter (very helpful for my bedroom setup where I don't have an isolated control room as such)

The VelociRaptors may not be afflicted with the same concerns regarding limited write cycles per memory block, but this is something I'm still investigating - from what I've had time to read, it was a big concern when flash SSD was in infancy, but is now better managed by the controllers

Having said that; again, other users suggest most operating systems' access methods are designed to take advantage of rotational drives and can, in some cases work against SSD.

In benchmarking tests, SSD still seems to have the sheer speed edge (at least from the RAID0 setups I saw).

As far as the purpose of faster drives go, I think I can only afford to trial a single 64Gb SSD at the moment; I think what you both say has merit; as I'm running East West and thinking about getting Komplete7, storing it on an SSD with it's fast reading may be a great advantage... but for the context of live recordings, might not match up so well to the raptors... but then I have the noise issue of 10k RPM drives spinning away urgh :|

For the moment, I think it's looking likely to be the SSD as an OS drive and maybe I'll have a better idea of how it perfoms based on trialing it in this way... I can build straightforward systems, but if the performance gains are up to scratch, I'll probably get the parts and have my system professionally configured by someone who really knows what they're doing.

In the meantime, anyone who's had experience running SSDs compared to HDDs, please share!
dariunas is offline Offline
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 27th September 2010 , 12:44 PM
Keeper o' the Keys!
 
Dave Boulden's Avatar
          
           
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kent, UK.
Posts: 2,470
Default

Do bear in mind that the only performance gain you'll see when using it as your OS drive is in boot-up times or initial application load times when you start a program loaded on the same drive... the ongoing performance of any software, once loaded, won't be improved.
______________________________
The Dining Room Studio
http://www.drstudio.co.uk/
Dave Boulden is offline Offline
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 2nd October 2012 , 04:08 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Jurasic coast, Dorset
Posts: 186
Post The History of Raid. Advantages and disadvantages

History of RAID: The idea of RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive [or independent] Disks) was designed as a fix to a problem of bestowing a high capacity storage combined with data availability and redundancy. In the past when hard drives capacities were limited and higher capacity drives were expensive, RAID offered little data protection and redundancy. Compounding the problem, CPU processor performance was increasing at an exponential rate, while disk subsystems were quickly falling behind and creating a bottleneck for server performance.

Back in 1988, a few researchers from the University of California-Berkeley came up with a set of guidelines for the original implementation of RAID. These guidelines would be referred to as RAID-1 through RAID-6. The various RAID levels do NOT mean that RAID 6 would be better than say RAID-1 or RAID-5. Your needs will determine what RAID level is best for your current situation.

Now, when using RAID, it’s recommended to use the same size drives. You can in fact, use various size drives in any given array, but the array will take the form of the smallest hard drive and the rest of the unallocated space on the larger hard drive will not be use and in fact just be a waste. For example, if you wanted to setup a RAID-0 array, it's recommended to have a minimum of two drives of the same size such as 2x80GB. Whenever using any RAID array, the array will combine the number of drives you are using and make it one entire drive. So if you were to RAID-0 2x80GB hard drives, this would make a 160GB hdd. (Will be less when you factor in the formatting)

RAID-0 - Data Striping w/out parity– 2 disk minimum:
Provides improved performance to that of a single, non-RAID-0 drive, and provides additional storage space to work with. This RAID array breaks down the information stored on the hard drive into blocks which are stored on each corresponding RAID-0 hard drive.

Array size: Size of Smallest Drive x Number of Drives

Advantages: This particular array is the easiest to implement, cheapest to implement, and most all controllers will support the use of RAID-0. Can make boot times quicker and make applications load faster.

Disadvantages: Not fault tolerant. In other words if one drive fails, all data is lost.

Recommendation: Do not use it in an environment where data is of the utmost importance such as a law firm or school corporation. If you implement this array, it is HIGHLY recommended that you schedule daily or weekly backup. (Preferably every couple of days or whenever you add new data) I would not use more than four drives either because you run the risk of losing data. One is better off to install RAID-0 in an environment that where applications require a high amount of performance such as gaming or working with digital imaging. Backup is required so that way if one (or all) drives fail, you can recover from the failure.

RAID-1 – Mirroring & Duplexing – 2 disk minimum without parity:
Set of two disks or more that more or less mirror one another. Meaning the data being written to the primary disk it is being duplicated on the secondary disk (or all other disks in the array). Data is written to all disks at the same time and can be read from each disk separately. Thus enhancing read time. The transfer rate per written block is equal to that of a single disk. If the primary disk in the array fails, the array can be configured to use the mirrored copy on one of the other disks in the array until you can replace the failed hard drive. After which, the data can be restored into the new drive from the other remaining drives in the array. This is NOT a substitute for backups.

Array size: takes the size of the smallest drive.

Advantages: 100% redundant. In other words if a single drive is lost to a failure, you will not lose data. RAID-1 can withstand multiple drive failures. RAID-1 is another simple array setup to implement.

Disadvantages: One of the lease efficient RAID arrays.

Recommendation: Best used in an environment that requires high read performance such as accounting, company payroll, or financial situations. You are still highly recommended to backup your data.

RAID-2 – Hamming Code ECC – 1 or more disks:
This RAID array performs disk striping at the bit level. The error-checking and correction can only be supported with a certain kind of hard drive. When a hard drive read occurs, the data on the drive is checked with the ECC codes to establish that everything is correct. If it happens to be incorrect, the data is corrected on the “fly”.

Array size: Varies

Advantages: Fault tolerant, “on the fly” data correction, high data transfers, simpler RAID design compared to RAID-3, 4, and 5.

Disadvantages: Not commercially available, high entry level cost, and it requires a high transfer rate.

Recommendation: Best left for business purposes.

RAID-3 – Parallel Transfer (Striping) with Parity – 3 disk minimum:
Data is divided amongst and written to the separate hard drives. The parity is generally made on writes, written to the parity drive, and checked on the read. If a disk happens to fail, then the data is restored across the striped array using the parity information that was written to one of the other hard drives. The performance of the disk reads in RAID-3 is that of a RAID-0 implementation. If you add more drives to increase the total size of the RAID-3 array, then the parity size of the drive must also be increased so that it can match or surpass the physical size of the individual array drives.

Array size: Size of Smallest Drive x Number of Drives - 1

Advantages: Fault tolerant, high read and write of data transfer, disk failure has an exiguous amount of impact, and has a high efficiency.

Disadvantages: Difficult and resource intensive if used in software RAID, complex, and the transaction rate is equal to a single hard drive (so long as the spindles are in sync)

Recommendation: Video production and or live streaming, Editing of Image and Video and any other application requiring high throughput/best for applications that require sequential data reads.

RAID-4 – Independent Data Disks w/ Shared Parity – 3 disk minimum:
It is similar to RAID-3 in that it contains a number of striped disks and it has a separate parity disk. However, the size of the striping block is bigger to reconcile more data. This is what makes RAID-4 similar to RAID-3 in that it has basically the same implementation, but it removes the bottlenecks that affected the transactional data in RAID-3.

Array size: Size of Smallest Drive x Number of Drives – 1

Advantages: High read rate, high aggregate read, Low parity (high efficiency)

Disadvantages: The worst write rate, worst write aggregate rate, difficult to rebuild in the event of a hard drive failure, block read rate is that of a single disk, not commercially available

Recommendation: Not a recommended use. There are better options to choose from.

RAID-5 – Striping with Parity – 3 disk minimum:
This is the most widely used RAID array used today. What RAID-5 does is the parity information gets distributed amongst all drives within the array unlike RAID-3 or 4. A certain amount of total disk space becomes unavailable on the array so that the parity data can be written to disk. Usually, the amount of drive space given for parity information is equal to the size of one entire drive in the array. Example, an array of 4x10GB drives would give you approximately 30GB of space for your data while the left over 10GB would be reserved for the parity information.

Array size: Size of Smallest Drive x Number of Drives - 1

Advantages: Fault tolerant, read speeds are quite high, high efficiency, good transfer rate

Disadvantages: Disk failure has a medium impact on the array (meaning you can only sustain one drive failure at a given time), has the most complex design, difficult to rebuild after a disk failure

Recommendation: File servers, database servers, Web servers, Email servers, Intranet servers, etc.

RAID-6 – Striping with Double Parity – 4 disk minimum plus a proprietary RAID controller:
RAID-6 is the exact same thing as RAID-5, but it offers double the parity of RAID-5 so that way you can sustain a two disk failure and still retain your data.

Array size: Size of Smallest Drive x Number of Drives - 2

Advantages: Fault tolerant, can sustain a two disk failure, perfect for a mission critical environment

Disadvantages: More complex, controller overhead for the parity is very high,

Recommendation: File servers, database servers, Web servers, Email servers, Intranet servers, etc.

Please note that neither RAID array is a preventative from doing regular backups. Backups are still highly recommended in case of an unforeseeable event.
Harleyjon is offline Offline
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
External hard drive Benoit Computer Hardware 8 16th December 2009 07:30 PM
Hard Drive Price check FRETPICK New Product Suggestions 4 3rd July 2009 10:34 PM
Portable Hard Drive TrevCircleStudios New Product Suggestions 7 25th February 2009 12:04 AM
Hard Drive allocations! mrfracas Computer Hardware 14 30th September 2008 05:06 PM
Hard drive speeds sureno Computer Hardware 14 30th August 2008 04:37 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.3.0
1999-2017 DV247 Ltd. All rights reserved.