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Old 14th September 2008 , 12:03 AM
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Default Who's actually studied music

so im getting this very daunting feeling im the only guy to have never been to college or uni and even studied music at any level and any aspect of music other than reading books i bought on line, is it just me or are there others in the boat with me being completely self taught starting to feel left out
and for those that have studied through bodies such as colleges and universities what exactly did you study musically?

and no smart @rse replies like "iv studied in the school of life" or better still "hard knocks"
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Old 14th September 2008 , 12:15 AM
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Nope you're not the only one... never been to any establishment to study music. I had private keyboard tuition for a little while (many years ago)... the guy was really good, geared the lesson to the genres I wanted to play and threw in some songwriting and arrangement tuition along the way. Apart from that though, I am completely self-taught. I have sometimes thought i would be cool to go do a one-to-one tuition session with a studio engineer and be able to pick his (or her!) brain and get them to show you how they do things and compare that to your own practices, then adopt a blend of the best of both.
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Old 14th September 2008 , 12:32 AM
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thought i was the only one, i read members posts and replies to threads and wonder to myself that if i had gone college then uni what these guys write might start making sense, i feel like its second nature to the music graduate to know complex theories etc that only if i had studied would i know and been made aware of.
starting to feel like the runt of the litter when i read some of the threads placed here. they leave me baffled at times but suppose it all adds to another run on the ladder to understanding this game
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Old 14th September 2008 , 08:17 AM
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no formal music education here either. About 27 years experience though.
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Old 14th September 2008 , 09:57 AM
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Nah, I'm completely self taught as well.

Most of the theory I've learnt has been from learning online or just as I go along. I used a basic notation program to begin with for my composition work, which taught me all the basics, and since then I've just learnt what I felt was useful. Playing guitar helps as well as that's how I learnt about pentatonic scales, etc. And I pretty much learnt guitar by going online and downloading tabs for songs I like.
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Old 14th September 2008 , 10:05 AM
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I have studied music (still am) I think it is an investment in the near future.
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Old 14th September 2008 , 11:34 AM
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I got a B in Music in my O level in 1983... I'm not sure it really helps much, especially as I can't remember the score to any tocattas or fugues now...
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Old 14th September 2008 , 11:51 AM
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I used to hate music lessons at school so was never interested in it. Personally I blame my specific school for that, they never really tried to motivate kids for it and assumed you would already be interested by the age of 12 if you were going to do music properly and the lessons were basically a doss. It wasn't until I started clubbing, got friendly with a couple of DJ's and thought it would be fun to learn to mix. Then I heard the Tidy Boys TW2 live set with samples and a few bootlegs, tried my own on Audacity and with my DNS 3500's hot start fashions. Recently I saved and bought a laptop and Cubase.
I really enjoy it but do feel rather out of my depth most of the time, but its encouraging to see a lot of self taught people here.
I did buy 'Music Theory for Dummies' but haven't really picked it up yet hehe.
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Old 14th September 2008 , 12:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilty View Post
I used to hate music lessons at school so was never interested in it. Personally I blame my specific school for that, they never really tried to motivate kids for it and assumed you would already be interested by the age of 12 if you were going to do music properly and the lessons were basically a doss. It wasn't until I started clubbing, got friendly with a couple of DJ's and thought it would be fun to learn to mix. Then I heard the Tidy Boys TW2 live set with samples and a few bootlegs, tried my own on Audacity and with my DNS 3500's hot start fashions. Recently I saved and bought a laptop and Cubase.
I really enjoy it but do feel rather out of my depth most of the time, but its encouraging to see a lot of self taught people here.
I did buy 'Music Theory for Dummies' but haven't really picked it up yet hehe.
yes iv read endless idiot guides to.... they are actually quite effective but maybe thats because im an idiot
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Old 14th September 2008 , 01:51 PM
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It's a little confusing because I never learned to read sheet music (which I know is the point) but I learnt bits and bobs from my Mum (and seeing what hideous noises I could get out the organ she used to have) but it's all in half-notes, quarter-notes etc as oppose to semi-tones and quavers so when I talk about it to people I have to spend time translating what they're saying as well hehe.
I have a hard time applying it dance music as well, I'm thinking about teaching myself some very basic piano as well, so it makes a little more sense, but it feels like I'll be biting off a little more than is chewable if I do.
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Old 14th September 2008 , 02:08 PM
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Half-notes, quater-notes, etc is how the Americans tend to refer to the length of the notes, so if you've learnt to refer to the notes like that, it can be a while before you get used to refering to them as quaver, crotchets, etc. Trust me, I've been through this as well.

Tbh, in a sequencer some theory doesn't matter, but it's always always good to learn chords, key signatures (and similar), as these help for coming up with song ideas and mixing.
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Old 14th September 2008 , 02:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilty View Post
It's a little confusing because I never learned to read sheet music (which I know is the point) but I learnt bits and bobs from my Mum (and seeing what hideous noises I could get out the organ she used to have) but it's all in half-notes, quarter-notes etc as oppose to semi-tones and quavers so when I talk about it to people I have to spend time translating what they're saying as well hehe.
I have a hard time applying it dance music as well, I'm thinking about teaching myself some very basic piano as well, so it makes a little more sense, but it feels like I'll be biting off a little more than is chewable if I do.
i started off learning the piano, not to play it but learning the theory behind it, it definately helps and more so i found when listening to a track you like i find i can break it down into keys, intervals etc etc. it's all hard work but then if it was easy every one would be doing it (nice and cheesey is on the menu today)
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Old 14th September 2008 , 02:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krykos View Post
Half-notes, quater-notes, etc is how the Americans tend to refer to the length of the notes, so if you've learnt to refer to the notes like that, it can be a while before you get used to refering to them as quaver, crotchets, etc. Trust me, I've been through this as well.

Tbh, in a sequencer some theory doesn't matter, but it's always always good to learn chords, key signatures (and similar), as these help for coming up with song ideas and mixing.
to be fair i prefer the whole note half note phrases, it just seems more sensible, quavers and crotechts are just to classical. having said that it is the more used variation but the most important thing it makes now difference which way you learned to call them they are pretty much all symbolized the same
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Old 14th September 2008 , 06:07 PM
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Well I studied music at uni. Or I studied a type of music. Shall we call it music theory. There was very little practice! It was heavy on musical periods - baroque, classical, romantic and 20th century - and on theory of music - how to read and write it, counterpoint and harmony. The harmony was of course classical harmony, so we learned to write choral SATB (soprano, alto, tenor, bass) arrangements like Bach would have done - the only problem is none of us was a Bach!! What else? I mentioned in another thread that we had a semester of music technology.

All in all it was pretty pathetic really as it wasn't anyway practical. It didn't let us compose - only arrange in SATB format - and didn't touch on contemporary musics such as dance. It seemed there was nothing outside of western classical music (in the broadest terms that that means) - no dance, no pop, no rock, no ethnic musics. It was great if you wanted to become an academic but if you wanted to do what I want to do now - make my own music it was practically useless. It was in no way attractive like the courses that were mentioned in the thread Learning Music Production.

I will say though that at least the theory and harmony is useful when it comes to putting a basic tune together. But we never touched on jazz harmony etc. The course did serve me well in my music teaching but then that had to be centred around what I knew - and what I knew came from what I had studied and been taught.

What's my opinion on being self-taught? I think it's great. I would love to be able to play tunes on the piano from memory or work them out by ear. I can do it to an extent but the system I went through can kill creativity and other useful skills.

What's my opinion on studying music or instrumental playing? Everything helps. And if you know what you want and are motivated, then courses do help. Experience is invaluable but I think that a certain theoretical knowledge of the subject matter is essential - be that gained from experience or formally. You gotta know the rules to break them!

I wish some of the course that are available now were around when it was my turn to study. I have a high level of musical education but at times that hinders what I want to do. Now, with a family etc to return to education and do a course in music production is more a dream than a reality. Now I am relying on the experience I gain every day!!!
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Old 14th September 2008 , 06:26 PM
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wow shane, i can understand how you feel about classical training killing inspiration in a genre like dance because something that may sound good in a dance track, a good chord progression etc may not strictly follow the classical rules so in theory it shouldn't work but it does. so if you followed strict classical training you wouldn't be able to explore that route. am i making any sense here, cos im starting to loose myself???

but i must admit i do envy those educated in music, im 27 and only wish i didn't flunk out of school but hindsight is a b!tch and i just get on with it now. may be the grass isn't always greener on the other side but it sure looks good from here
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