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Old 21st October 2009 , 04:00 PM
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Default Cleaning guitar parts?

My Ibanez has gotten all disgusting on all of the metal parts on the body - tone knobs, pickup surroundings & the floyd rose.

I've tried a few household cleaners but none seem to be restoring it to it's usual shine

It has always had this problem and I used to be able to just wipe them with a dry cloth with a bit of elbow grease and it sorted it, however it's been in the case for a few months and the dirt/grime/whatever has built up too much!

Any suggestions? Car polish and wire-wool are 2 contenders I'm thinking! Pics below to show you what I mean -



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Old 21st October 2009 , 04:12 PM
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Have you tried WD40 ?

The knob looks like it is chrome? Danger is that it is of course just a thin coating of chrome. Finger marks will slowly corrode the thin coating of chrome, so sadly you may never get the orginal shine back. Wire wool could have a disastrous result - cleaning away the dirt and more of the chrome plating

If any of the chrome plated pieces can be temporarily removed then you do have the option of using a DIY home chrome plating kit to give them a new shiny chrome cover.
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Old 21st October 2009 , 04:17 PM
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have you tried "Mum"
thats the first thing i go for when i need something cleaning, very versatile
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Old 21st October 2009 , 04:34 PM
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Will give WD40 a go, thanks
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Old 21st October 2009 , 05:10 PM
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A little bit of surfing has suggested to me that the WD40 is good for protecting the chrome from corrosion once you have cleaned it. There are many references to coca cola and aluminium foil to clean the chrome!

http://www.ehow.com/how_4457299_remo...rome-coke.html
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Old 21st October 2009 , 05:15 PM
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Interesting discussion/warnings about WD40 here;
http://www.talkbass.com/forum/archiv.../t-208973.html

Quote:
The misinformation about WD-40 in this thread is frightening. Wow.

As a motorcyclist, I've been involved in countless discussions about what WD-40 actually is, what it's uses are, what it's made up of, what to use it on (and not use it on), and so on. I've even talked with a former chemist for the company that makes the stuff.

The "WD" in the name stand for "Water Displacer." The primary use for WD-40 is as a light petroleum-based lubricant and as a temporary seal against water on most untreated and unpolished metals. It can also be used on some industrial-grade polymers and plastics and other heavy-duty, man-made composites. Believe it or not, the primary ingredient in WD-40 is very simple: kerosene. WD-40 does NOT build up unless gunked up on a surface or held in a surface that is absorbent; in other words, on flat surfaces it will eventually evaporate due to heat, low pressure and air movement.

Two metals to avoid are untreated aluminum (it will eventually discolor it because raw aluminum is very porous) and low-quality chrome. I personally use WD-40 to lube my motorcycle's chain and clean nearly all of its non-chromed metal parts.

That said, WD-40 should NOT be used on rubber, softer grades of plastic, unsealed wood, most translucent or clear coverings and finishes, glass or most all absorbent and/or porous materials.

The reason some believe WD-40 promotes rust is because the water that it displaces has to go somewhere else that is untreated by the WD-40. Usually that's somewhere nearby. In a WD-40 can, for instance, condensation builds up in and around the can (especially the space between the interior walls) and rust eventually forms there. On cans that have been sitting for years, rust can form on the outside near the nozzle and on the bottom rim.

As for its uses on bass guitars: Zon actually recommends using WD-40 to clean frets and its phenowood fingerboards. Strings and brass should be fine, but use it VERY sparingly. Keep it away from the body (especially if the wood is either untreated or painted/clearcoated and waxed) and ANY plastic parts (pickup covers, nuts, knobs, etc.) at all costs.
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Old 10th November 2009 , 10:39 AM
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the old trick is to use lighter fluid!! that'll clean the knobs etc, it also dissolves the gunk in the screws etc!!
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Old 10th November 2009 , 11:10 AM
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good job it's difficult to find a venue where you can smoke and perform at the same time eh :P
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Old 10th November 2009 , 02:02 PM
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Default cleaning guitars

Lighter fluid (Naphtha) is great for cleaning all parts,including frets on a guitar.Just remember to wear gloves,it's not good for your skin.
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